Five Aerobic Bouncing Exercises to Get the Most Out of Your Rebounding Trampoline

It seems like the benefits of rebounding on a trampoline are endless. From increasing bone density to increasing endurance, rebounding can do a lot for individuals who want to avoid high-impact cardio. Plus, if you have a rebounder with upper body resistance bands, you’ll be able to vary your routine that much more.

Although these exercises are designed for trampolines with upper body resistance tubes, these exercises can be performed on any rebounder.

Types of rebounding

There are three main ways to use a rebounder: health bouncing, strength bouncing and aerobic bouncing. If you’re health bouncing, you’re barely leaving the surface of the trampoline. This technique is used primarily by those with limited mobility or attempting to flush their lymphatic system. Strength bouncing is more intense. It requires you to jump as high as you can during your rebounding routine. While this also aids the lymphatic system, it also builds more strength in your lower body and core.

But if you want to maximize its fat blasting, calorie burning potential, you have to perform aerobic bouncing exercises. Compared to health bouncing, strength bouncing and even jogging, moderate to intense rebounding burns more calories. In fact, you can anticipate to burn anywhere from 75 to 96 calories in 12 minutes at a moderate intensity.

The five fat-burning, cardiovascular exercises

  1. High knees. Tedious when performed on the ground, high knees are actually fun on a rebounder. You can get your knees up higher than you can when on the ground. Plus, the higher you get your knees up, the more you can tone up your upper thighs and glutes. To integrate resistance bands, simply pulse your arms up when your right knees comes up, then down when the left knee comes up.
  1. Tuck jumps. In addition to strengthening your lower body and burning calories, tuck jumps will also engage your core – if you’re doing them right. Be sure not to hunch over. Keep your spine tall, bringing your knees to your chest. Not vice versa. If you’re using upper body resistance bands, grab the left band with your right hand and the right rube with your left hand, making an “x.” Then, every time you land, perform a quick row, then get back into tuck jumping.
  1. Sprints. Kick it up a notch and try out some sprints! Bend your knees, swing your arms and step as quickly as possible. If you want to integrate resistance bands, make sure they’re tight throughout the entire swing of the arm.
  1. Side-to-side hops. Bend your knees, keep your feet together then hop to the left, then right, left, right. You get it. The lower you go, the more it will engage your glutes. For even more of a challenge, add a tuck. It’s hard to incorporate resistance bands with this one, but it should be enough in itself.
  1. Out/ins. Please excuse the older video, but the best way to explain this exercise is to show it. You’ll see out/ins demonstrated in the first 15 seconds of the video. The lower you go, the more you’ll get out of it. Aim for sitting on a chair or stool. To add upper body work, make an “x” with the bands and perform a row during the “out” portions of the routine, pulsing if you’re two outs, two ins.

 

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